Table of Contents

Handbook on Teaching and Learning in Political Science and International Relations

Handbook on Teaching and Learning in Political Science and International Relations

Edited by John Ishiyama, William J. Miller and Eszter Simon

With a focus on providing concrete teaching strategies for scholars, the Handbook on Teaching and Learning in Political Science and International Relations blends both theory and practice in an accessible and clear manner. In an effort to help faculty excel as classroom teachers, the expert contributors offer representation from various types of institutions located throughout the world. Split into three distinct parts, this book discusses curriculum and course design, teaching subject areas and in class teaching techniques.

Chapter 17: Teaching gender politics

Fiona Buckley

Subjects: education, teaching and learning, politics and public policy, international relations

Extract

The concept of gender is continually experiencing a ‘process of definition refinement and theory production’ (Lovenduski 1998, p. 337). Nicholson (1994, p. 79 cited in Lovenduski 1998) notes that, while gender was developed as a contrasting term to sex ‘to depict that which is socially constructed as opposed to that which is biologically given’, the term is often used to refer ‘to any social construction’ to do with ‘the male/female distinction’. In many respects this ‘theoretical conundrum’ (Lovenduski 1998, p. 337) has generated an ongoing search for conceptual definition, the result of which is that the study of gender politics has changed significantly during the past 40 years. Early studies of gender and politics were primarily concerned with examining women in politics reducing research to what Ritter (2007, p. 389) describes as exercises in counting: how many women vote, are elected, are appointed ministers, are supporters of one party or another, etc.

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