Table of Contents

Handbook of Research on Sustainable Consumption

Handbook of Research on Sustainable Consumption

Edited by Lucia A. Reisch and John Thøgersen

This Handbook compiles the state of the art of current research on sustainable consumption from the world’s leading experts in the field. The implementation of sustainable consumption presents one of the greatest challenges and opportunities we are faced with today. On the one hand, consumption is a wanted and necessary phenomenon important for society and the economy. On the other, our means of consumption contradicts many important ecological and social long-term goals. Set against this background, the Handbook aims to offer an interdisciplinary overview of recent research on sustainable consumption, to draw attention to this subject and to encourage discussion and debate. In 27 chapters, leading authorities in the field provide their expertise in a concise and accessible manner.

Chapter 16: Consumer responsibility for sustainable consumption

Michael G. Luchs and Rebecca A. Miller

Subjects: economics and finance, behavioural and experimental economics, economic psychology, environment, ecological economics, environmental sociology

Extract

For many of us, the mention of the word ‘responsibility’ in relation to sustainability evokes images of companies that market environmentally responsible products and/or that promote various social causes. One might instead imagine companies that manufacture products with questionable social value and/or who exploit the human and physical resources within their supply chains and beyond. This focus on the corporation seems appropriate given the significant presence and influence of brands and branded products in modern society. Similarly, many academics interested in researching sustainability have also paid significant attention to the responsibility of the corporation. For example, academics within the fields of management and marketing have studied the effect of corporate social responsibility (CSR) on firm performance (Luo and Bhattacharya 2009; Sen and Bhattacharya 2001) and consumer responses to corporate ethics and CSR activities (Becker-Olsen et al. 2006; Brown and Dacin 1997; Folkes and Kamins 1999; Jackson 2005).

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