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Renewable Energy Law in the EU

Renewable Energy Law in the EU

Legal Perspectives on Bottom-up Approaches

New Horizons in Environmental and Energy Law series

Edited by Marjan Peeters and Thomas Schomerus

This timely book examines the role played by regional authorities in the EU in the transition towards renewable energy. Drawing on both academia and practice, the expert contributors explore some of the key legal questions that have emerged along the energy transition path. Specific attention is paid to support mechanisms, administrative procedures for authorizing renewable energy projects, and opportunities for allowing citizens, particularly citizens living near renewable energy projects, participate financially in renewable energy production.

Chapter 4: Promotion of renewable energy sources by regions: The case of the Spanish autonomous communities

Iñigo Del Guayo

Subjects: environment, environmental law, law - academic, energy law, environmental law, european law, politics and public policy, environmental politics and policy


This chapter aims to analyse critically the role played by the Spanish autonomous communities in the promotion of the use of renewable energies in Spain, with a particular focus on the promotion of renewable energy sources for electricity production. After a short reference to Spain’s becoming a worldwide leader in the promotion of wind and solar energy, the chapter explains the constitutional position of the autonomous communities within the energy field. Following this, the function of the Spanish generation market is briefly explained, in order to fully understand the attached remarks on the position of the autonomous communities vis-à-vis the promotion of an energy paradigm based on a stronger penetration of renewable energies. Spain is heavily dependent on foreign sources of energy, since there are neither oil nor gas fields of significance. Spain mainly relies on the consumption of oil and oil products. The biggest share of national energy production is nuclear, followed by renewable energies and coal. Between 1985 and 2004, imported natural gas was the energy sector with the fastest development, and from 2004 to 2012 there was a remarkable increase in the use of renewable energies, in which Spain has become a worldwide leader.

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