Table of Contents

Research Handbook on EU Criminal Law

Research Handbook on EU Criminal Law

Research Handbooks in European Law series

Edited by Valsamis Mitsilegas, Maria Bergström and Theodore Konstadinides

EU criminal law is one of the fastest evolving, but also challenging, policy areas and fields of law. This Handbook provides a comprehensive and advanced analysis of EU criminal law as a structurally and constitutionally unique policy area and field of research. With contributions from leading experts, focusing on their respective fields of research, the book is preoccupied with defining cross-border or ‘Euro-crimes’, while allowing Member States to sanction criminal behaviour through mutual cooperation. It contains a web of institutions, agencies, and external liaisons, which ensure the protection of EU citizens from serious crime, while protecting the fundamental rights of suspects and criminals.

Introduction

Valsamis Mitsilegas, Maria Bergström and Theodore Konstadinides

Subjects: law - academic, criminal law and justice, european law

Extract

This book provides an advanced analysis of EU criminal law as a distinct policy area and field of research, which has procedural, substantive and institutional dimensions. It aims to reflect critically on the wide range, scope and significance of EU criminal legislation and institutions and their impact upon the course of European integration. This study is highly pertinent now because tackling cross-border crime has incrementally become one of the European Union’s top priorities. Indeed, the EU aspires to maintain its reputation as an Area of Freedom, Security and Justice (AFSJ) based, inter alia, on accelerated mutual assistance in criminal matters. Almost complementary to the prohibitions imposed upon Member States to create the right conditions for the free movement of persons in the EU, the fast-developing criminal law acquis serves to prevent the free movement of offenders and to reduce their capacity to exploit their fundamental freedom to move across the Member States in order to resort to unsanctioned cross-border criminal activity.