Table of Contents

Handbook on Wealth and the Super-Rich

Handbook on Wealth and the Super-Rich

Edited by Iain Hay and Jonathan V. Beaverstock

Fewer than 100 people own and control more wealth than 50 per cent of the world’s population. The Handbook on Wealth and the Super-Rich is a unique examination of both the lives and lifestyles of the super-rich, as well as the processes that underpin super-wealth generation and its unequal distribution. Drawing on a multiplicity of international examples, leading experts from across the social sciences offer a landmark multidisciplinary contribution to emerging analyses of the global super-rich and their astonishing wealth. The book’s 22 accessible and coherently organised chapters cover a range of captivating topics from biographies of illicit super-wealth, to tax footprint reduction, to the environmental consequences of super-rich lives and their conspicuous consumption.

Chapter 7: Making money and making a self: the moral career of entrepreneurs

Paul G. Schervish

Subjects: economics and finance, regional economics, geography, economic geography, human geography, urban and regional studies, regional economics, regional studies

Extract

The purpose of this chapter is to take an initial step in constructing a social psychology of the entrepreneur by examining the confluence of financial world-building and moral self-construction connected to the process of entrepreneurship. In effect, being an entrepreneur is a moral career, a joint venture of making money and making a self. The participation of individuals in the historically given conditions of entrepreneurial wealth generation creates a specific type of agent and not just a specific type of social organization. I base my analysis on findings generated from intensive interviews with 49 entrepreneurs drawn from a subsample of a study of 130 individuals with, in 2014 dollars, a median yearly income greater than US$1 million and a median net worth in excess of US$16.5 million.

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