Table of Contents

Research Handbook on Crisis Management in the Banking Sector

Research Handbook on Crisis Management in the Banking Sector

Research Handbooks in Financial Law series

Edited by Matthias Haentjens and Bob Wessels

In this timely Handbook, over 30 prominent academics, practitioners and regulators from across the globe provide in-depth insights into an area of law that the recent global financial crisis has placed in the spotlight: bank insolvency law.

Chapter 17: The rule of law: Protection of property

Jacques Sluysmans, Willem Bosma, Matthijs Timmer and Nikky van Triet

Subjects: economics and finance, financial economics and regulation, money and banking, law - academic, company and insolvency law, finance and banking law


Combining the subject of ‘Crisis Management in the Banking Sector’ with the rule of law is no easy feat: not for lack of substance, but for the choices that have to be made to fit everything that could be said on the matter into a chapter of limited length. We have chosen to build this chapter on three – in our view important – issues concerning the rule of law in relation to a situation of banks in crisis. First, we will take a look at the supranational framework of – especially – the European Convention on Human Rights that – as we shall see – mainly via Article 1 of the First Protocol may offer (legal) protection to those parties that are likely to suffer in case of government intervention to save a bank in crisis. Second, we turn to two specific and well-known cases where government did intervene – the cases of Northern Rock and notably SNS – to analyse the effect of the rule of law in those case studies at a national level. Third, we take a look at the near future, in which (at least within the European Union) national instruments aimed at containing any banking crisis will have to conform to the European Banks Recovery and Resolution Directive. The thin red line connecting these three issues already becomes obvious.

You are not authenticated to view the full text of this chapter or article.

Elgaronline requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books or journals. Please login through your library system or with your personal username and password on the homepage.

Non-subscribers can freely search the site, view abstracts/ extracts and download selected front matter and introductory chapters for personal use.

Your library may not have purchased all subject areas. If you are authenticated and think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

Further information