Table of Contents

Public Administration Reforms in Europe

Public Administration Reforms in Europe

The View from the Top

Edited by Gerhard Hammerschmid, Steven Van de Walle, Rhys Andrews and Philippe Bezes

Based on a survey of more than 6700 top civil servants in 17 European countries, this book explores the impacts of New Public Management (NPM)-style reforms in Europe from a uniquely comparative perspective. It examines and analyses empirical findings regarding the dynamics, major trends and tools of administrative reforms, with special focus on the diversity of top executives’ perceptions about the effects of those reforms.

Chapter 22: Coordination challenges and administrative reforms

Per Lægreid, Tiina Randma-Liiv, Lise H. Rykkja and Külli Sarapuu

Subjects: business and management, public management, politics and public policy, european politics and policy, public administration and management, public policy

Abstract

Across Europe there has been an increasing trend towards addressing coordination problems within the public sector. New administrative instruments and reforms have been introduced to deal with the alleged disintegration or fragmentation brought about by NPM, to increase steering capacity and to deal with ‘wicked problems’. This chapter examines top executives’ assessments of horizontal and vertical coordination problems both internally, within the central government, and externally, in partnerships with stakeholders in the private and civil sectors. We present survey data from 17 European countries and explore variations in role identification relating to coordination culture, coordination mechanisms, the assessment of coordination quality and public management performance with respect to coordination. The study shows that although hierarchy is still a dominant coordination mechanism, the perceived quality of coordination is more linked to the use of network-type arrangements and the presence of a coordination culture.

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