Innovation and Entrepreneurship in the Global Economy

Innovation and Entrepreneurship in the Global Economy

Knowledge, Technology and Internationalization

New Horizons in Regional Science series

Edited by Charlie Karlsson, Urban Gråsjö and Sofia Wixe

Innovation and entrepreneurship are the prime drivers in the global economy. This scholarly book identifies some of the key forces behind innovation and entrepreneurship at the same time as it closes the gap between science and technology R & D, innovation, entrepreneurship, productivity growth, and internationalization. The expert contributions explore the underlying forces and add substantial theoretical and empirical knowledge to the current state-of-the-art in several research fields including the economics of innovation and entrepreneurship, regional economics, economic geography and international economics.

Chapter 5: Routines: do they stimulate or hinder learning and innovation in industrial production?

Knut Ingar Westeren

Subjects: business and management, entrepreneurship, economics and finance, economics of entrepreneurship, economics of innovation, regional economics, geography, economic geography, innovation and technology, economics of innovation, urban and regional studies, regional economics


The concept of a routine has been given attention in the economics, business and organizational literature for many years. In this chapter we start with a discussion of how definitions of the concept have developed – the starting point being ‘pattern’, which is linked to rules/guidelines of behavior. The most common interpretation is that routines are understood as activity patterns that regulate behavior. In more recent analysis we have seen routines interpreted in a collective way linked to group behavior. The chapter also discusses different characteristics that can be linked to the concept of routines. Important themes here are stability of routines, how they repeat themselves and to what extent they are context and path dependent. The chapter ends with an empirical example where we discuss how learning and innovations can be seen in relation to creation, maintenance and changes in routines.

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