Institutional Reform of Air Navigation Service Providers

Institutional Reform of Air Navigation Service Providers

A Historical and Economic Perspective

Transport Economics, Management and Policy series

Institutional Reform of Air Navigation Service Providers deals with the changes that have taken place in this major, technologically progressive industry as many countries moved away from direct provision by the government to forms of corporate or private provision. The author provides an up-to-date institutional and economic analysis of air navigation service providers’ efforts to reform their governance and funding structures under these changes.

Chapter 3: Air navigation services

Subjects: economics and finance, transport, innovation and technology, organisational innovation


This chapter provides an overview of air navigation services, including a brief history and some notes about the technology involved in their provision. Neither are intended to be full-fledged descriptions, just an overview of issues to introduce the themes. For more detailed descriptions, the interested reader should, for example, read the sources mentioned in this chapter. In their current form, air navigation services emerged from the new international arrangements that were put in place in many areas of society after World War II. For air navigation services the defining moment was the Convention on International Aviation held in Chicago in November 1944, better known as the ‘Chicago Convention’. From that five-week meeting, a new set of rules and guidelines regulating air navigation services and aviation in general came to be. A new United Nations organisation to coordinate and regulate international air travel was also to be established, the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO), created in 1947.

You are not authenticated to view the full text of this chapter or article.

Elgaronline requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books or journals. Please login through your library system or with your personal username and password on the homepage.

Non-subscribers can freely search the site, view abstracts/ extracts and download selected front matter and introductory chapters for personal use.

Your library may not have purchased all subject areas. If you are authenticated and think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

Further information