Table of Contents

Combating Poverty in Europe

Combating Poverty in Europe

Active Inclusion in a Multi-Level and Multi-Actor Context

Edited by Rune Halvorsen and Bjørn Hvinden

Discovering methods to combat poverty and social exclusion has now become a major political challenge in Europe. This book offers an original and timely analysis of how actors at the European, national and subnational levels meet this challenge. Combining perspectives on multilevel and network coordination, the editors discuss to what extent actors join forces in these efforts and identify the factors limiting the coordination achieved in practice. The book builds on a European study comparing Germany, Italy, Poland, Sweden and the UK.

Chapter 4: Poverty and social inclusion as emerging policy arenas in the EU

Maurizio Ferrera and Matteo Jessoula

Subjects: politics and public policy, european politics and policy, public policy, social policy and sociology, comparative social policy, labour policy, welfare states


The so-called ‘European Social Dimension’ has been the subject of a vast debate in the past couple of decades. The literature tends to be divided between cautious optimism and Euro-pessimism. The optimists point to the purposeful autonomy of key institutions in Europe’s ‘multilevel’ polity and the gradual ‘socialization’ of the EU regulatory order. The pessimists argue instead that economic integration has contributed to the ‘opening’ of the European economy and the breaking down of the borders of trade competition while contributing little to new institution building, especially in the social sphere. For a long time, pessimists have seen the asymmetry between market-making ‘negative integration’ and market-correcting ‘positive integration’ as conducive to perverse effects (Scharpf, 1999). They have often evoked such effects in the debate with the notions of ‘social dumping’, ‘social devaluations’ or a ‘race to the bottom’ between different member states in terms of welfare standards and corresponding tax levels.

You are not authenticated to view the full text of this chapter or article.

Elgaronline requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books or journals. Please login through your library system or with your personal username and password on the homepage.

Non-subscribers can freely search the site, view abstracts/ extracts and download selected front matter and introductory chapters for personal use.

Your library may not have purchased all subject areas. If you are authenticated and think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

Further information