Table of Contents

How to get Published in the Best Management Journals

How to get Published in the Best Management Journals

Edited by Timothy Clark, Mike Wright and David J. Ketchen Jr.

This much-anticipated book is a comprehensive guide to a successful publishing strategy. Written by top journal editors, it introduces the publishing process, resolves practical issues, encourages the right methods and offers tips for navigating the review process, understanding journals and publishing across disciplinary boundaries. As if that weren’t enough it includes key contributions on open access, publishing ethics, making use of peer review, special issues, sustaining a publications career, journal rankings and increasing your odds of publishing success. This will be a must read for anyone seeking to publish in top journals.

Chapter 11: You miss 100% of the shots you don’t take

Annette L. Ranft and Anne D. Smith

Subjects: business and management, corporate governance, entrepreneurship, international business, marketing, organisational behaviour, research methods in business and management, strategic management


This famous quote – you miss 100% of the shots you don’t take – by ice hockey Hall of Fame player Wayne Gretzky captures what we want to address in this short chapter: the need to get your papers out and under review! Let’s be clear – we are not advocating against getting friendly reviews or feedback from conferences in order to strengthen your paper. (In our roles as Associate Editors, we have certainly seen many desk rejects of papers that needed much more work before submission.) Yet, just as some may have the propensity to pull the trigger too soon when submitting to a journal, we know there are others who are slow to send their manuscripts out to a journal, if at all. These are researchers who take weeks, months, or years to tinker with a manuscript, scrapping whole sections or the entire paper, collecting more data, reading one more book or stream of research, and/or rethinking the theoretical frame. We are addressing our comments to these colleagues whom we know well – those who are tinkerers, perfectionists, slow, or simply never “take a shot” by sending a paper to a journal.

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