Table of Contents

Emerging Dynamics of Sustainability in Multinational Enterprises

Emerging Dynamics of Sustainability in Multinational Enterprises

New Horizons in International Business series

Edited by John R. McIntyre, Silvester Ivanaj, Vera Ivanaj and Rabi N. Kar

This review addresses some of the pertinent questions arising out of the fast changing dynamics of sustainability development in multinational enterprises focusing their strategies, practices and models on emerging economies. Contributors from India, Europe and the United States offer fresh perspectives on strategic considerations for firms as well as case material.

Chapter 11: Measuring environmental consciousness

Kavita Sharma and Monika Bansal

Subjects: business and management, international business, management and sustainability

Extract

The increase in consumers’ environmental consciousness is a good incentive for marketers to adopt green marketing practices (Finisterra do Paco and Raposo, 2010). Researchers like Stisser (1994) suggested a long time ago that concern for environmental issues has altered consumers’ basic habits, with increased environmental consciousness resulting in an emphasis on sustainable consumption. The change in consumers’ consciousness towards the environment leads to marketers seeking a competitive advantage through greening of products and other environment-oriented strategies (such as those relating to changes in packaging and processes). ‘Green consumerism’ is, however, a very limited phenomenon in terms of both the share of consumers in the total population and willingness to pay for environmentally superior products (Kuhn, 2005). There has been research, traced back to 1970, including the work of Kassarjian (1971), Anderson and Cunningham (1972), Kinnear et al. (1974) and Belch (1982), that attempts to understand environmentally conscious consumers and the way they engage in green consumerism in the form of varied proenvironmental behaviours.

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