Eutopia

Eutopia

New Philosophy and New Law for a Troubled World

Philip Allott

There is a vacuum of philosophy to make sense of a world dominated by a disorderly global economy, by science and engineering, by ideologies, and by popular culture. There is a vacuum of law to bring order to relations between states that are more threatening than they have ever been. Thomas More’s Utopia (1516) re-thought everything in another difficult new world. Philip Allott’s Eutopia (2016) reclaims the best of human thought to empower us in making a better human world.

Chapter 1: Changing Reality by Changing Ideas

Philip Allott

Subjects: law - academic, human rights, law and society, legal philosophy, public international law

Extract

The human mind is perverse in not recognising its own achievement. It behaves as if the world that it has created were some sort of mysterious natural phenomenon that it has inherited, as a second place in which to live, alongside the natural world that it certainly did not create. The human mind faces the human world as if it were a second natural world. And yet every feature of the human world from the greatest to the smallest – from the greatest empire or the greatest work of engineering to the most modest human family or the smallest work of art – comes from nowhere but from within the infinitely and ceaselessly creative human mind. We are a species that found within itself, as if by a miracle, world-creating and world-transforming power and self-creating and self-transforming power.