International Trade and Food Security

International Trade and Food Security

Exploring Collective Food Security in Asia

NUS Centre for International Law series

Edited by Michael Ewing-Chow and Melanie Vilarasau Slade

Food security is one of the greatest challenges of our time. Through a collection of commissioned studies, which draw upon the experience of leading experts and scholars in trade, investment, law, economics, and food policy, this book assesses whether self-sufficiency is an adequate response to the food security challenges we face

Chapter 12: Conclusion: Moving to collective food security

Michael Ewing-Chow and Melanie Vilarasau Slade

Subjects: law - academic, asian law, international economic law, trade law, public international law

Extract

There were numerous policy responses to the 2008 food crisis, all of which ostensibly placed the achievement of food security front and center in the policy considerations of many governments. Many countries turned to self-sufficiency as an answer. There are clear limitations to this policy option, particularly in the case of import-dependent countries in which the socio-political and/or geographical conditions for agricultural production are less than ideal. Yet despite its high costs, food self-sufficiency represents a food security strategy followed by a wide range of countries. This is understandable given that it is the responsibility of national governments to ensure food security for their population. Self-sufficiency is in essence a very costly food insecurity insurance scheme, limited to the national level and one that not all States are able to afford. Further, whilst it can ensure sufficient production (i.e., physical availability) in some States, it is not a guarantee against individual food insecurity (i.e., economic and physical access) within those States.

You are not authenticated to view the full text of this chapter or article.

Elgaronline requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books or journals. Please login through your library system or with your personal username and password on the homepage.

Non-subscribers can freely search the site, view abstracts/ extracts and download selected front matter and introductory chapters for personal use.

Your library may not have purchased all subject areas. If you are authenticated and think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

Further information