Table of Contents

Environmental Valuation in Developed Countries

Environmental Valuation in Developed Countries

Case Studies

Edited by David Pearce

This is the second of two volumes of case studies that illustrate how environmental economists place values on environmental assets and on the flows of goods and services generated by those assets. This important book assembles studies that discuss broad areas of application of economic valuation – from amenity and pollution through to water and health risks, from forestry to green urban space. In this, his last book, the late David Pearce brought together leading European experts, contributors to some two dozen case studies exploring the frontiers of economic valuation of natural resources and environmental amenity in the developed world.

David Pearce (1941–2005): A Tribute

Edited by David Pearce

Subjects: economics and finance, environmental economics, valuation, environment, environmental economics, valuation

Extract

Those working in and around the field of environmental valuation, including the contributors to this volume, owe David Pearce a massive debt of gratitude. This academic field is now burgeoning and is arguably the single most active area of environmental economics. Obviously, this was not always so. In its formative years the subject needed its champions and in David we had a champion of the highest order. He combined numerous qualities that many of us would be content to have in isolation: intellectual agility and clarity, a legendary ability to communicate often complex academic ideas and an undiminished willingness to engage, persuade and not merely be content to preach to the converted. Whether arguing the case for environmental valuation at the ‘frontier’ or more latterly for its extension to the last bastions where economic thinking had previously left little mark, David always carried the conviction that good and broadly accepted environmental policy-making could not proceed without a better understanding of the value that the public placed on environmental improvements. Sadly, we have now lost our champion. Of course, there are others but as is the way with true innovators each is unique because, to coin a phrase, to make each one ‘they have to break the mould’. David’s sudden passing was a huge loss for all of those in the environmental research and policy community. He is greatly missed already. But our particular condolences and thoughts must go to David’s family who have lost a husband and father far too...