Sustainable Forest Management and Global Climate Change

Sustainable Forest Management and Global Climate Change

Selected Case Studies from the Americas

Edited by Mohammed H.I. Dore and Rubén Guevara

The UN Framework Convention on Climate Change recognises that, in the formulation of a global strategy for reducing global emissions of carbon (the main factor in global warming) forests could play an important role. This book highlights that role and demonstrates how the forests of the world may be harvested judiciously and sustainably. The authors argue that the forests are more than just a source of timber and wood; they discuss the role that forests play in reducing global warming, in preventing soil erosion and in helping to minimise the loss of biodiversity. Drawing on the expertise of contributors associated with the analysis of forests, this book is an in depth and fascinating discussion as well as a policy guide for the sustainable management of forests.

Chapter 1: Simplified guidelines for planning sustainable and diversified forest management: a case study of the Villa Mills Demonstrative Experimental Area

Grace Saénz and Robin aus der Beek

Subjects: economics and finance, environmental economics, environment, climate change, environmental economics, management natural resources

Extract

1. Simplified guidelines for planning sustainable and diversified forest management: a case study of the Villa Mills Demonstrative Experimental Area Grace Saénz and Robin aus der Beek INTRODUCTION The uncertainty which exists regarding long-term forest development, along with the precarious economic balance of forest management, emphasizes the importance of presenting diversified, ecologically sustainable and economically attractive management alternatives. This implies a change in the traditional management focus, which is almost exclusively directed towards production and valuation of timber and underestimates the direct or indirect benefits that society gains from the fulfilment of other forest functions. However, the above only makes sense if management is based on good planning, since increasing the interest in and demands on the forest will inevitably increase the likelihood of conflictive situations. For this reason, planning should allow a definition of the demands, plan for possible conflicts and offer adequate solutions, providing the other components of forest administration (forest policy, silviculture, forest economics, timber extraction and so on) with the basic information to define their objectives, take decisions and control their execution. ANALYSIS OF FOREST FUNCTIONS AND THE RESPECTIVE IMPLICATIONS FOR FOREST MANAGEMENT One reason that traditional forest management has failed as a valid tool for forest conservation is that it focuses almost exclusively on production and valuation of timber and not on the fulfilment of all the other forest functions, 19 20 Biophysical aspects of forestry and carbon management underestimating their direct and indirect...

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