Entrepreneurs and the Transformation of the Global Economy

Entrepreneurs and the Transformation of the Global Economy

Anthony Patrick Ellison

Anthony Ellison cuts through conventional neo-classical interpretations to expose the indispensable contribution of entrepreneurs in driving the market process and, in particular, in accomplishing the deregulation of the transportation, trade, telecommunications and financial regimes both in North America and across the globe. Entrepreneurs have an important role in any economy, but in this seminal study, the author argues that they have played a crucial part in shaping the contemporary global market. Entrepreneurs and the Transformation of the Global Economy situates the emergence of the contemporary global market economy within an historical context.

Introduction

Anthony Patrick Ellison

Subjects: business and management, entrepreneurship, economics and finance, public sector economics, transport, environment, transport, urban and regional studies, transport

Extract

This book examines the causes and consequences both of regulating and of deregulating transport, telecommunication, trade and financial regimes. Its aim, simply stated, is to review methodologies appropriate for a practising political economist in general, and for a transport economist in particular. However, the writing of it has taken me, unexpectedly, into many fields which I might once have considered remote from, or at best peripheral to, transport economics, and an unexpected unity has emerged among the several disciplines which interest me, revealing the underlying unity in human thought and endeavour. As a professional economist, I initially set out to explain the deregulation of the transport modes in North America. The task appeared to be almost routine: another cataloguing of sequential events leading inevitably to a known conclusion. But, as I wrote, an unexpected dialectic emerged from the conditions of regulation and deregulation. The word ‘regulation’, as unremarkable at first as ‘obedience’ or ‘law-abiding’, began to take on a more significant, if not ominous, character. It slowly became apparent that, for these antithetical terms to be in any sense comprehensive, explanations had to address the question as to why, in the first place, regulation had occurred. It seemed to me that the right to movement is as central to the concept of human freedom as are the right to think or the right to act. Freedom, in the truest sense, can only exist in the absence of regulatory restraint on movement. Therefore, a free man may be defined, not only...