Table of Contents

International Handbook of Urban Systems

International Handbook of Urban Systems

Studies of Urbanization and Migration in Advanced and Developing Countries

Edited by H. S. Geyer

This authoritative Handbook provides a comprehensive account of migration and economic development throughout the world, in both developed and developing countries. Some of the world’s most experienced researchers in this field look at how population redistribution patterns have impacted on urban development in a wide selection of advanced and developing countries in all the major regions of the world over the past half century.

Preface

Edited by H. S. Geyer

Subjects: development studies, migration, social policy and sociology, migration, urban and regional studies, migration, urban studies

Extract

The original idea of an edited volume reflecting urban changes that have occurred in selected countries over the past half century, was inspired by the writings of H.G. Wells. Judging from improvements in communication technology a century ago, and mixing fact with a good measure of common sense and creative thinking, H.G. Wells (1902) anticipated great changes in urban development during the twentieth century. The following collage of quotations from his book, in italics, highlights what he foresaw. Firstly, he predicted that advances in the technology of the combustion engine, which led to developments such as the private motor car, short and long haul trucking and bus services - all of which were designed to improve the transportation of goods, material and people in and between cities would ultimately result in the development of giant cities. Although George Gissing, the nineteenth century novelist and good friend of Wells, stated that giant cities such as London were little more than attractive, tumultuous whirlpools’ that ultimately would be ‘spinning down to death’, Wells was much more optimistic. Based on his assessment of the effect new advances in transport technology on land, sea and in the sky would have on urban development, Wells predicted that these new forces, at present still so potently centripetal in their influence, bring with them, the distinct promise of a centrfugal application that may be finally equal to the complete reduction o all our present congestions. f The passion for nature, a house in its own garden, the...