Table of Contents

A Handbook of Economic Anthropology

A Handbook of Economic Anthropology

Elgar original reference

Edited by James G. Carrier

This unique Handbook contains substantial and invaluable summary discussions of work on economic processes and issues, and on the relationship between economic and non-economic areas of life. Furthermore it describes conceptual orientations that are important among economic anthropologists, and presents summaries of key issues in the anthropological study of economic life in different regions of the world. Its scope and accessibility make it useful both to those who are interested in a particular topic and to those who want to see the breadth and fruitfulness of an anthropological study of economics.

Introduction

Edited by James G. Carrier

Subjects: economics and finance, behavioural and experimental economics, economic psychology, methodology of economics, social policy and sociology, research methods in social policy, sociology and sociological theory

Extract

From the beginnings of the sub-discipline, economic anthropology has been concerned with circulation, and arguably this is the topic through which subdisciplinary work has had the most notable impact on anthropology generally and on those from other disciplines. Circulation is also the topic where what economic anthropologists have to say touches most directly on popular economic thought, especially the idea of the market. The chapters in Part III cover the classic forms of circulation that have interested those in the subdiscipline, ranging from formal ceremonial exchange to monetised markets. The final chapter is a consideration of circulation of a special sort, one that exists in the absence of exchange. This chapter is a sketch of a topic that has, thus far, attracted relatively little attention. However, it is a rewarding one because, however quietly, it raises questions about what seems to be a common assumption, that circulation requires the exchange of value. 229