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The Nobel Memorial Laureates in Economics

The Nobel Memorial Laureates in Economics

An Introduction to Their Careers and Main Published Works

Howard R. Vane and Chris Mulhearn

Erudite, accessible and lucidly written, this book provides a stimulating introduction to the careers and main published works of the Nobel Memorial Laureates in Economics. It will prove to be an invaluable reference book on key figures in economics and their path-breaking insights. The vignettes should also encourage the reader to sample some of the Laureates’ original works and gain a better understanding of the context in which new ideas were first put forward.


Howard R. Vane and Chris Mulhearn

Subjects: economics and finance, economic psychology, history of economic thought


THE 1973 NOBEL MEMORIAL LAUREATE WASSILY LEONTIEF WASSILY LEONTIEF Wassily W. Leontief (1906–99) © The Nobel Foundation Wassily Leontief was born in Saint Petersburg, Russia in 1906. At the age of 15 he entered the University of Saint Petersburg (renamed Leningrad in 1924) where he studied philosophy, sociology and economics and from where he obtained his MA in social science as a ‘learned economist’ in 1925. Leaving Russia, Leontief went to Germany where he worked at the Institute for World Economics at the University of Kiel. In 1928 he obtained a PhD from the University of Berlin. After a year spent in China, as an economic adviser to the Chinese government on the railway network, he went to the United States in 1931 (later becoming a US citizen) where he worked for a brief period as a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. In 1932 Leontief joined the faculty at Harvard University where over a period of four decades he was promoted from instructor (1932–33) to assistant professor (1933–39), associate professor (1939–46) and Professor of Economics (1946–53), before finally holding the Henry Lee Chair of Political Economy from 1953 to 1975. While at Harvard he founded the Harvard Economic Research Project, devoted to input–output analysis, and served as its director from 1948 to 1973. In 1975 he left Harvard to join New York University, where he founded the Institute of Economic Analysis. 58 WASSILY LEONTIEF Leontief’s many offices and honours included...

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