Free Trade in the Americas

Free Trade in the Americas

Economic and Political Issues for Governments and Firms

New Horizons in International Business series

Edited by Sidney Weintraub, Alan M. Rugman and Gavin Boyd

This book examines the Free Trade Area of the Americas (FTAA), an ambitious venture in regional market integration which builds on the principles of the North American Free Trade Agreement. It assesses the long-term corporate and public policy measures to cope with the increased monetary, fiscal and structural interdependence that will be required if the benefits of the FTAA are to be realized.

Chapter 9: Western hemisphere energy development: the continuing search for security

Stephen J. Randall

Subjects: business and management, international business, economics and finance, international economics


Stephen J. Randall A range of international and domestic challenges in the first decade of the 21st Century have reinforced the importance of Western Hemisphere energy development for the security of the United States as well as other regional nations. Such security concerns, as this chapter underlines, considerably predated the political, diplomatic and then military conflict with Iraq in early 2003, the terrorist attack on New York and Washington, DC on September 11, 2001, or the US-led coalition which employed military action to remove the Taliban from power in Afghanistan in the course of 2002. Oil shortage scares in the early 1970s and in 1979–80 at the time of the Iranian crisis and the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan had already underscored once again the fragility of the Near and Middle East, a fragility that was exacerbated by the end of the Cold War. The larger global energy context is critical for an understanding of the environment in which US energy policies in general and in particular toward the Western Hemisphere are evolving. The UN Energy Commission for Europe in 2001 effectively captured the European situation in its brief description of the circumstances that confront the region, although the description could also be applied to much of the world’s energy development. ‘The winds of change’, the report concluded with a sense of drama, ‘are blowing across the ECE region, buffeting energy markets, industries and enterprises. Governments in central and eastern Europe as well as central Asia are busy reshaping, restructuring...

You are not authenticated to view the full text of this chapter or article.

Elgaronline requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books or journals. Please login through your library system or with your personal username and password on the homepage.

Non-subscribers can freely search the site, view abstracts/ extracts and download selected front matter and introductory chapters for personal use.

Your library may not have purchased all subject areas. If you are authenticated and think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

Further information