Table of Contents

International Documents on Corporate Responsibility

International Documents on Corporate Responsibility

Edited by Stephen Tully

International Documents on Corporate Responsibility includes the principal international, regional and national instruments drafted by intergovernmental organisations or states as well as codes of conduct formulated by industry associations, trade unions and non-governmental organisations. The coverage includes the fields of human rights, international criminal and environmental law, labour standards, international trade, armed conflict, sustainable development, corruption, consumer protection and corporate governance. Each document is accompanied by a brief explanatory commentary outlining the historical origins of the instrument, the principal actors involved, controversial negotiation issues, applicable implementation procedure, and identifies further reference material.

Chapter 99: International Law Commission: Principles of Inernational Law Recognized in the Charter of the Nuremberg Tribunal and in the Judgement of the Tribunal, 1950

Edited by Stephen Tully

Subjects: law - academic, company and insolvency law, corporate law and governance


99. International Law Commission: Principles of International Law Recognized in the Charter of the Nuremberg Tribunal and in the Judgment of the Tribunal, 1950 Commentary: The ILC was requested to ‘formulate the principles of international law recognized in the Charter of the Nuremberg Tribunal and in the judgment of the Tribunal’: UNGA Resolution 177 (II)(a). Since the Principles had previously been affirmed by UNGA Resolution 95(1)(1946), the ILC considered it unnecessary to ascertain whether they constituted international law. For commentary, see ILC (1950), Yearbook, 2, 374–8. For the work of the ILC, see Principle I Any person who commits an act which constitutes a crime under international law is responsible therefor and liable to punishment. Principle VI The crimes hereinafter set out are punishable as crimes under international law: a) Crimes against peace: i) ii) Planning, preparation, initiation or waging of a war of aggression or a war in violation of international treaties, agreements or assurances; Participation in a common plan or conspiracy for the accomplishment of any of the acts mentioned under (i). b) War crimes: Violations of the laws or customs of war which include, but are not limited to, murder, ill-treatment or deportation to slave-labour or for any other purpose of civilian population of or in occupied territory, murder or ill-treatment of prisoners of war, of persons on the seas, killing of hostages, plunder of public or private property, wanton destruction of cities, towns, or villages, or devastation not justified by military...

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