Technology, Knowledge and the Firm

Technology, Knowledge and the Firm

Implications for Strategy and Industrial Change

Edited by Ken Green, Marcela Miozzo and Paul Dewick

There is a long-standing tradition of research that highlights the importance of differences in the organizational and technological capabilities of firms and their effect on economic performance. This book expands on this theme by exploring the role of knowledge and innovation in firm strategy and industrial change. Underlying the volume is the belief that firms have distinctive methods of operation and that these processes have a strong element of continuity.

Introduction

Edited by Ken Green, Marcela Miozzo and Paul Dewick

Subjects: business and management, knowledge management, organisational innovation, innovation and technology, innovation policy, knowledge management, organisational innovation

Extract

Ken Green, Marcela Miozzo and Paul Dewick This collection of essays brings together papers that were presented at the sixth biennial conference of Advances in Social and Economic Aspects of Technology (ASEAT) on ‘Knowledge and Economic and Social Change: New Challenges to Innovation Studies’ that was held in Manchester between 7 and 9 April 2003. The contributions have a common theme: the role of knowledge and innovation in firm strategy and industrial change. Underlying all the papers is an understanding that firms have distinctive ways of doing things and, moreover, that these ways of doing things have strong elements of continuity. The papers explore the role played by firms in developing, linking and utilizing knowledge produced in many social institutions to advance their organizational and technological capabilities. Understanding how firms advance their capabilities is essential to understanding how the economy operates and changes. There is a long tradition of research underlining the importance of differences in organizational and technological capabilities of firms and their effect on economic performance. Edith Penrose’s writings are the first point of departure to the understanding of how firms grow in the direction of their capabilities and how these capabilities expand and alter. Penrose (1959) saw the growth of a firm as based on the possession and development of unique and idiosyncratic resources. The second point of departure is George Richardson (1972) who presents firms as sets of activities which require knowledge, experience and skill in their performance. Offering a different perspective...