The Entrepreneurial Culture

The Entrepreneurial Culture

Network Advantage Within Chinese and Irish Software Firms

Denise Tsang

The Entrepreneurial Culture highlights the subtle yet powerful influence of national cultural heritage on entrepreneurship ventures, using an alternative and fresh approach to explore the entrepreneurial culture of Chinese and Irish software firms. This book presents a unique analysis of entrepreneurship theory development, along with a single industry, cross-national study of entrepreneurship illustrating the impact of values from contrasting cultures.

Preface

Denise Tsang

Subjects: business and management, entrepreneurship, international business

Extract

_____________________________________________________________ The growth of high technology economies, industries and firms is often sustained by a combination of social and economic values. This book explores the entrepreneurial culture of successful Chinese and Irish software firms, which incorporate the materialism prevalent in contemporary China and Ireland as well as the inherited values of network and achievement. Specifically, it will concentrate on the advantages associated with the diverse Chinese and Irish networks (as derived from the two nations’ respective core cultural values of vertical collectivism and vertical individualism) in relation to the strategies utilized by successful software firms during different growth stages. It will, therefore, illustrate the subtle but powerful influence of national culture on the variation of entrepreneurship across nations with contrasting cultural heritages. Networks have been a prominent theme in the recent debate and literature on entrepreneurship. On one level, the network approach relates to the personal networks of entrepreneurs or to the dyadic relationship between an entrepreneur and an economic actor arising from recurrent social interactions as well as information exchange. On another level, the network approach revolves around the operational context of firms and subsequently their internal and external relationships. This study concentrates primarily on the personal networks of software entrepreneurs, but also briefly covers the institutional framework that facilitates inter-firm relationships within software clusters located in cities such as Beijing and Dublin. The central theme recurring throughout this book is that despite the differences in basic assumptions, and critical structural and relational dimensions, Chinese social networks and Irish personal...