The Dynamics of Public Policy

The Dynamics of Public Policy

Theory and Evidence

New Horizons in Public Policy series

Adrian Kay

In The Dynamics of Public Policy, Adrian Kay sets out the crucial methodological, theoretical and empirical implications of two important trends in the social sciences: a frequently expressed ambition for analysis of ‘movies not stills’ and the regular observation that policy, politics and governance is becoming more complex.

Preface and acknowledgements

Adrian Kay

Subjects: politics and public policy, public policy

Extract

During the writing of this book, I moved to a new job in Australia. This slowed down the writing of the book significantly but prompted some new reflections on policy dynamics and the incorporation of references to the situation in Australia to complement the empirical chapters based on my previous work on UK and EU public policy. If the reflective pause in writing ever tried the patience of my publisher, Edward Elgar, it never showed: thank you to Catherine and her colleagues for supporting this project through to completion. In trying to think about temporality in policy analysis I have benefited greatly from many discussions with former colleagues at the School for Policy Studies at the University of Bristol, as well as my new ones at the Department of Politics and Public Policy at Griffith University. I would like to thank the publishers of the following journals for permission to draw on material, in heavily revised form, I have published previously: (2003), ‘Path dependency and the CAP’, Journal of European Public Policy, 10(3), 405–21; and (2001), ‘Beyond policy community: the case of the GP fundholding scheme’, Public Administration, 79(3), 561–77. My greatest debt is to Siwan and I dedicate this book to her. Dw i’n dy garu di. Adrian Kay Brisbane, March 2006 vii 28116_Dynamics/Prelims 22/9/06 15:25 Page 8