Handbook of Research on Entrepreneurship Policy

Handbook of Research on Entrepreneurship Policy

Elgar original reference

Edited by David B. Audretsch, Isabel Grilo and A. Roy Thurik

This unique Handbook provides a solid foundation for essential study in the nascent field of entrepreneurship policy research. This foundation is initially developed via the exploration of two significant propositions underpinning the nature of entrepreneurship policy research. The first is that entrepreneurship has emerged as a bona fide focus of public policy, particularly with respect to economic growth and employment creation. The second is that neither scholars nor policy makers are presently equipped to understand the public policy role for entrepreneurship.

Chapter 1: Explaining Entrepreneurship and the Role of Policy: A Framework

David B. Audretsch, Isabel Grilo and A. Roy Thurik

Subjects: business and management, entrepreneurship

Extract

* David B. Audretsch, Isabel Grilo and A. Roy Thurik Introduction This book has two cornerstones. The first is that entrepreneurship has emerged as a bona fide focus of public policy, particularly with respect to economic growth and employment creation. For example, the primary role played by entrepreneurship was identified by Romano Prodi during his tenure as President of the European Commission, ‘Our lacunae in the field of entrepreneurship needs to be taken seriously because there is mounting evidence that the key to economic growth and productivity improvements lies in the entrepreneurial capacity of an economy’ (Prodi, 2002, p. 1). The European Union does not have a monopoly on the concern about entrepreneurship. From the other side of the Atlantic, Mowery (2005, p. 40) observes: During the 1990s, the era of the ‘New Economy,’ numerous observers (including some who less than 10 years earlier had written off the US economy as doomed to economic decline in the face of competition from such economic powerhouses as Japan) hailed the resurgent economy in the United States as an illustration of the power of high-technology entrepreneurship. The new firms that a decade earlier had been criticized by such authorities as the MIT Commission on Industrial Productivity (Dertouzos et al., 1989) for their failure to sustain competition against large non-U.S. firms were seen as important sources of economic dynamism and employment growth. Indeed, the transformation in U.S. economic performance between the 1980s and 1990s is only slightly less remarkable than the failure of...

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