Successful Professional Women of the Americas

Successful Professional Women of the Americas

From Polar Winds to Tropical Breezes

Betty Jane Punnett, Jo Ann Duffy, Suzy Fox, Ann Gregory, Terri R. Lituchy, Silvia Inés Monserrat, Miguel R. Olivas-Lujan and Neusa Maria Bastos F. Santos

This accessible and original book relates the fascinating story of successful women across the Americas: women who are managers, business owners, university professors and administrators, doctors, lawyers and government ministers.

Chapter 10: Successful Women: A Vision of Brazil

Betty Jane Punnett, Jo Ann Duffy, Suzy Fox, Ann Gregory, Terri R. Lituchy, Silvia Inés Monserrat, Miguel R. Olivas-Lujan and Neusa Maria Bastos F. Santos

Subjects: business and management, diversity and management, gender and management

Extract

Neusa Maria Bastos F. Santos Brazil is an integral part of the South American continent. The population of almost 170 million is 50.7 per cent female (IBGE, 2002; Publifolha, 2002). Over 70 per cent of the women work in the formal market. Many of them are successful in their personal and/or professional lives. Here is a quote from one successful Brazilian woman that captures the Brazilian spirit of success: A successful person should be before everything else a happy person. Accomplishment leads to human growth, even if it means recognizing human limits. I share the achievements that I have had because the positive results were not achieved alone. This assumes my own mistakes are a learning opportunity that transforms me to be even better. Above all, ‘everything is grace’; this is how I want to be a successful person. POLITICAL, SOCIAL, ECONOMIC AND CULTURAL PANORAMA Brazil is the largest country in South America, occupying 47 per cent of the South American territorial area, which is divided into five areas – North, North-east, South-east, South and Centre-west. See the map in Figure 10.1. The Brazilian population is composed of several ethnic groups: in the South and South-east German, Italian and Japanese prevail and in the North the African and Dutch prevail. In spite of this great heterogeneity, Brazil does not have any dominant ethnic group. Portuguese is the official language of Brazil, but English is widely spoken in tourist areas. It is a largely Catholic country (88 per cent). Life expectancy...

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