Multinational Banking in China

Multinational Banking in China

Theory and Practice

New Horizons in International Business series

Chen Meng

Multinational Banking in China examines key issues in the market entry and development of foreign banks in the People’s Republic of China using data collected from 37 in-depth interviews and questionnaire surveys.

Research methods

Chen Meng

Subjects: asian studies, asian business, business and management, asia business, international business


SAMPLE/DATA SOURCES This study investigated multinational banking in China. The research questions were examined using a sample of foreign banks in Mainland China. Analysis focused on subsidiary level including representative office, branch, subsidiary and JV. A list of foreign banks was obtained from China Statistical Yearbook of Finance. The list was then verified with a database at the central bank. A total of 178 banks were surveyed. The number equaled the actual total number of foreign banks operating in China when this research was carried out. It was assumed that this source represented a good approximation to the population of qualifying banks and that any selection biases would be minimal. Our sampled banks for interviews were selected based on the criteria of location, nationality and local market commitment. We targeted banks located in major cities such as Beijing and Shanghai where foreign banks clustered and local economic activities were active. This decision was also driven by the need to keep the interview costs of the project relatively low. A total of 33 foreign banks were interviewed, accounting for 18.5 per cent of the total number of foreign banks. The country of origin of these 33 banks was diversified across 20 different nations that accounted for 53 per cent of the total 38 source countries. At the initial stage of the fieldwork, four banks were introduced by the Ministry of Finance and the PBOC. We later found out that being introduced from top supervision bodies might have...

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