Globalisation, Citizenship and the War on Terror

Globalisation, Citizenship and the War on Terror

Edited by Maurice Mullard and Bankole A. Cole

This book explores globalisation and the war on terror in a world that is becoming increasingly and significantly polarised and in which dialogue is undermined. The authors contend that citizenship does not obey a static definition, and that its meaning is located in changing economic, social and political contexts. Equally, civil, political and social rights are continually being politically defined. The war on terror has, the book argues, influenced issues of civil liberties and prioritised the need for ‘security’ over and above the protection of human rights: it has redefined the meaning of the rule of law.

Chapter 1: Introduction

Maurice Mullard and Bankole A. Cole

Subjects: law - academic, human rights, politics and public policy, human rights, international politics, international relations, terrorism and security

Extract

Maurice Mullard and Bankole A. Cole BACKGROUND This book seeks to explore the nature of globalisation and the ‘war on terror’ and how both processes are shaping and defining citizenship globally and within nation states. Citizenship does not obey a static definition. The concept is contestable and its meaning is located in changing economic, social and political contexts. Equally, civil, political and social rights are continually being politically defined. The war on terror has influenced issues of civil liberties and prioritised the need for ‘security’ over and above the protection of human rights. It has redefined the meaning of the rule of law. The nation state has become more and more coercive and the ‘state of exception’ is gradually becoming normalised (see Agamben, 2005). The wars in Iraq and Afghanistan are replays of colonial ‘civilising missions’ in Africa, clouded by deceit, corruption and corporate invasion of pacified homelands. Like the concessionaire and chartered companies in nineteenth-century Africa, the International Monetary Fund (IMF), the World Bank, the Development Fund for Iraq (DFI), and other international financial institutions (IFIs) are, as a consequence of the war on terror, actively involved in the corporate takeover and economic occupation of Iraq. Unlike in colonial times, in the war on terror the enemy is ‘global’ and the war is fought both abroad and at home. The enemy is within and without. The war is fought on all fronts. While the ‘imperial’ armies of the Allied forces are engaged in...