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Frontier Issues in Ecological Economics

Frontier Issues in Ecological Economics

Philip Lawn

Ecological economics formally emerged in the late 1980s in response to the failure of mainstream economic paradigms to deal adequately with the interdependence of social, economic and ecological systems. Frontier Issues in Ecological Economics focuses on a range of cutting-edge issues in the field of ecological economics and outlines plausible measures to achieve a more sustainable, just, and efficient world for all.

About the author

Philip Lawn

Subjects: development studies, development economics, economics and finance, development economics, environment, ecological economics

Extract

The author Philip Lawn received his Bachelor of Economics in 1991 from Flinders University, Australia. After working for a short time as an economics tutor, Philip embarked on postgraduate studies at Griffith University in Brisbane, Australia. In 1998, Philip received his PhD in ecological economics and, in the same year, returned to Flinders University to take on a position as a lecturer in environmental and ecological economics. In recent years, Philip has published a number of articles in the field of ecological economics. He also has three other books to his name – Toward Sustainable Development (Lewis Publishers, 2000), Sustainable Development Indicators in Ecological Economics (ed.) (Edward Elgar, 2006), and Measuring Genuine Progress (co-authored with Matthew Clarke) (Nova Science Publishers, 2006). Philip is currently the editor of an Inderscience journal entitled The International Journal of Environment, Workplace, and Employment which serves as a forum for examining ways to reconcile the ecological sustainability and full employment objectives. Philip is a member of the International Society for Ecological Economics (ISEE) and is on the executive board of the Australia and New Zealand branch (ANZSEE). vii