Corporate Governance in Banking

Corporate Governance in Banking

A Global Perspective

Edited by Benton E. Gup

Recent corporate scandals, together with the effects of globalization, have led to an increasing interest in corporate governance issues. Little attention has been paid, however, to international laws and recommendations dealing with corporate governance in banking from a global perspective. This impressive international set of expert contributors – academics, practitioners and regulators – remedies the lack of attention by examining the various issues and concerns of this important topic.

Chapter 10: Corporate Governance: The Case of Australian Banks

Mohamed Ariff and Mohammad Z. Hoque

Subjects: business and management, corporate governance, economics and finance, corporate governance, financial economics and regulation, money and banking, law - academic, corporate law and governance, finance and banking law


Mohamed Ariff and Mohammad Z. Hoque INTRODUCTION TO CORPORATE GOVERNANCE OF BANKS This chapter attempts to provide a summary report on the status of corporate governance in the banking sector of Australia. A historical fact often vaunted in Australia is that no depositor has lost his deposit in a bank run for over 100 years. Although there were bank failures depositors were paid off despite there being no deposit insurance! Nevertheless, since governance is a much broader issue than that of depositor protection, bank governance has emerged even in Australia as a key public issue with significant movements in the industry on self-regulation and, at the regulatory level, this interest has spawned significant regulatory changes. It is still pertinent, in our opinion, to continue to examine the connection between good corporate governance and the performance of banks. It is argued that a superior governance structure, accepting that it is adhered to fastidiously at each bank, would provide the best financial services to the clients within a well-governed banking system. To achieve this there is a need for an environment that encourages banks to compete for customers in a competitive banking environment. There are sufficient institutional structures in Australia providing an impetus for promoting competition. Given the recent spectacular failures of governance, such as that of a foreign exchange loss in a leading bank, NAB, and the bankruptcy of an insurance firm, both in 2005, a scrutiny of corporate governance practices is timely to ensure that poor management...

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