Table of Contents

Handbook on Third Sector Policy in Europe

Handbook on Third Sector Policy in Europe

Multi-level Processes and Organized Civil Society

Elgar original reference

Edited by Jeremy Kendall

While scholarship on the social, economic and political contributions of organisations existing between the market and the state has proliferated in recent years, no sustained attention has previously been paid to how such organisations are collectively treated by, and respond to, public policy. The expert contributors examine the policy environment for, and evolving policy treatment of, the third sector in the Czech Republic, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Sweden, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom from a comparative perspective. They also look at how the third sector relates to multi-level European policy processes, including the Open Method of Co-ordination, the Community Method, nationally-led ‘partnership’ approaches within an overall EU framework and the United Nations International Year of Volunteering; an initiative implemented in the EU but originating externally.

Glossary

Edited by Jeremy Kendall

Subjects: social policy and sociology, comparative social policy

Extract

Coalition refers to an alliance of policy actors or to looser camps or constellations of third sector policy actors who come together to pursue policy change or policy perpetuation goals motivated by shared commitments, values and/or interests. In the TSEP network, research effort has been directed at describing and analysing coalitions formed and perpetuated by full- or part-time specialist third-sector-specific policy actors. Collective noun refers to the language used by domestic or EU-level actors to group organizations sectorally at a level higher than vertical policy fields, and involving some implicit or explicit reference to ownership and control not reducible to either the market or the state. In some countries the collective noun and associated expressions involves a relatively stable or dominant language supported by formal or informal institutions and practices, while in others there is a more open field, with competing concepts and formulations, often fluidly coexisting and interacting with one another. Community method has been described by the European Commission as ‘the EU’s usual method of decision-making, in which the Commission makes a proposal to the Council and Parliament who then debate it, propose amendments and eventually adopt it as EU law. In the process they will often consult other bodies such as the European Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions’ (European Commission, 2009). It was the ‘classical’ or ‘traditional’ method of processing EU policy in the second half of the twentieth century, but in the twenty-first has been increasingly supplemented or displaced by more...