Environmental Policy and Corporate Behaviour

Environmental Policy and Corporate Behaviour

Edited by Nick Johnstone

For the last 30 years, analysis of the inner workings of the firm has been largely absent from economic assessments of environmental policy. Recent work has highlighted the importance of understanding a firm’s commercial motivations, decision-making procedures and organizational structure when designing and implementing public environmental policies. Environmental Policy and Corporate Behaviour responds to this need, investigating the many internal challenges faced by firms seeking to implement new policies and achieve significant and long-lasting environmental progress.

Annex 2: Survey Design and Protocol

Edited by Nick Johnstone

Subjects: business and management, management and sustainability, economics and finance, environmental economics, public sector economics, environment, environmental economics, environmental management

Extract

The survey design and protocol drew inspiration from the principles laid out in Dillman’s (1978) ‘Total Design Method’. QUESTIONNAIRE DESIGN ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● designed in collaboration between research teams (approximately 14 researchers) and advisory group members (single representative from each participating country); email correspondence and two meetings held at the OECD in 2003 and 2004 – 18 different versions discussed; inputs on survey design obtained from representatives of the OECD’s Business and Industry Advisory Committee; two-way translation from English into French, Japanese, Norwegian, German and Hungarian; pre-tested amongst a selection of representative manufacturing facilities in Japan, Germany and Canada; subsequent modifications to ease completion, ensuring that survey did not exceed 12 pages in length and remained easily legible; sampling; population of manufacturing facilities with 50 or more employees in seven participating countries; sample derived from universal population databases (except for United States – database of TRI facilities); stratified sampling by industrial sector (2-digit level) and by facility size (50–99; 100–249; 250–499; Ͼ500). DATA COLLECTION ● postal surveys mailed out to almost 17 000 manufacturing facilities on or around 7 January 2003 (see schedule below); 268 Appendix 2 ● ● 269 ● additional possibility to fill in questionnaire online for United States survey (give website address); accompanying letter (OECD and departmental/university letterheads) addressed to chief executive officers and/or ‘environmental managers’; two postal reminders (in some cases telephone) to a selection of nonrespondents within one and two months of initial mail-out to increase response rate. Schedule for data collection Indicative timeframe 16 November 2002...

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