Teaching in the Global Business Classroom

Teaching in the Global Business Classroom

Carol Dalglish and Peter Evans

Teaching in the Global Business Classroom presents an educational framework for effective teaching and learning in the global classroom. It provides practical tools for teachers through suggestions for innovative curriculum design, lecture techniques, group work and participation activities, as well as the use of case studies and assessment methods.

Chapter 1: Introduction to International Business Education

Carol Dalglish and Peter Evans

Subjects: business and management, management education, management and universities, education, management and universities, management education, teaching and learning

Extract

You learn from foreigners that there is more than one path to a goal. Effective wealth creation demands that we use all the paths available to us. (HampdenTurner and Trompenaars 1993: 16, cited in Sinclair and Wilson 1999: 27) International education around the world has grown exponentially in recent years. Tertiary education around the world is becoming ‘internationalized’: that is, there is an increasing mix of domestic and international students in classes. Many Western countries including the United States, the United Kingdom, Australia, New Zealand, Canada and South Africa provide education for significant numbers of foreign students from an increasingly diverse range of countries. ‘Foreign’ education is big business. Initially these students came from the region in which the university operated, that is, there was extensive movement between European countries, Britain attracted students from the Commonwealth where there were historical links, South Africa attracted students from other parts of Africa, and Australia and New Zealand’s biggest source countries were in South East Asia. As of 2007, the following are currently the top source countries for international students: ● ● ● ● ● USA: the top five source countries are India, China, South Korea, Japan and Canada. These five countries make up 46 per cent of the foreign students studying in higher education in the States. UK: the top five non-EU source countries are China, the USA, India, Malaysia and Hong Kong. These students make up 49 per cent of the non-EU foreign students. Australia: the top five source countries, that make up 56...