EU Intellectual Property Law and Policy

EU Intellectual Property Law and Policy

Elgar European Law series

Catherine Seville

Intellectual property (IP) is a crucial contributor to economic growth and competitiveness within the EU. This book offers a compact and accessible account of EU intellectual property law and policy, covering copyright, patents, designs, trademarks and the enforcement of rights. The author also addresses aspects of the free movement of goods and services, competition law, customs measures and anti-counterfeiting efforts.

Preface

Catherine Seville

Subjects: law - academic, european law, intellectual property law

Extract

My aim in writing this book is to offer a compact and accessible account of EU intellectual property law and policy. It covers the substantive provisions and procedures which apply throughout the EU, making extensive reference to the case law – the sheer volume of which is utterly daunting for students attempting to explore the area on their own. The book is intended to be manageable in terms of length and ease of understanding. Basic material is rehearsed as appropriate, although it is not intended as an introductory book for those entirely unfamiliar with the subjects of intellectual property or EU law. I hope the book will be used as a work of reference, as well as for wider study, so sections stand on their own, with cross-references offered where these will be helpful. Intellectual property is not isolated from other aspects of EU law and policy; it is regarded as a crucial contributor to economic growth and competitiveness, especially in fields of technology. Aspects of the free movement of goods and services, competition law, customs measures, and anti-counterfeiting efforts are all engaged. This work takes a broad view of these interactions, and their impact on law and policy. It is also essential to set EU intellectual property law in the wider international context necessary for understanding it, and its application to intellectual property law within the EU member states. The exploitation of intellectual property is increasingly global, bringing corresponding pressures for global harmonisation. Often the harmonisation of intellectual property law...