Table of Contents

Research Handbook on Intellectual Property and Geographical Indications

Research Handbook on Intellectual Property and Geographical Indications

Research Handbooks in Intellectual Property series

Edited by Dev S. Gangjee

Provenance matters like never before. Legal regimes regulating the use of Geographical Indications (GIs) protect commercially valuable signs on products – such as Darjeeling and Champagne – which signal the link to their regions of origin. Such regimes have been controversial for over a century. A rich, interdisciplinary work of scholarship, this Research Handbook explores the reasons for and consequences of GIs existing as a distinct category within intellectual property (IP) law. Historians, geographers, sociologists, economists and anthropologists join IP specialists to explore the distinguishing feature of GIs, that certain products are distinctively linked or anchored to specific places.

Chapter 9: Thinking locally, acting globally: how trade negotiations over Geographical Indications improvise ‘fair trade’ rules

Antony Taubman

Subjects: business and management, knowledge management, innovation and technology, knowledge management, law - academic, intellectual property law


The work of the legislator is to give names, and the dialectician must be his director if the names are to be rightly given? (390d) . . . And therefore a wise dictator . . . should observe the laws of moderation and probability (414e) . . . But if this is a battle of names, some of them asserting that they are like the truth, others contending that they are, how or by what criterion are we to decide between them? For there are no other names to which appeal can be made, but obviously recourse must be had to another standard which, without employing names, will make clear which of the two are right, and this must be a standard which shows the truth of things. (438e) (Plato, Cratylus) Strictly speaking there are no signs but differences between signs. (Ferdinand de Saussure, Third Course of Lectures on General Linguistics [1910–11]) But if you say ‘How am I to know what he means, when I see nothing but the signs he gives’ then I say ‘How is he to know what he means, when he has nothing but the signs either?’ (Ludwig Wittgenstein, Philosophical Investigations)

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