Knowledge, Organizational Evolution, and Market Creation

Knowledge, Organizational Evolution, and Market Creation

The Globalization of Indian Firms from Steel to Software

Gita Sud de Surie

Knowledge, Organizational Evolution, and Market Creation documents the emergence of the Indian multinational by looking at data from firms in the ‘old’ economy, such as those in manufacturing, steel-making, automotive components and heavy machinery and the ‘new economy’ such as software and biotechnology. The author provides insights on knowledge transfer, innovation and capability building processes through in-depth case studies in these industries and suggests that both entrepreneurship and distributed innovation are critical for the growth of firms globally.

Preface

Gita Sud de Surie

Subjects: business and management, international business, knowledge management, organisational innovation, economics and finance, industrial organisation, innovation and technology, knowledge management, organisational innovation

Extract

Gita Sud de Surie The genesis of this book was a visit to India in August 1992, a visit that was momentous in shaping events in my life for the next ten years. I relocated to India to study Indian organizations for my doctoral work in 1993. After completing my doctoral work in 1996, I stayed on as an academic in India until the spring of 2001. This prolonged immersion in India, both as a researcher and academic, provided me with a unique advantage – a position from which I could be an insider. Consequently, I was able to experience first hand the structure of Indian organizations and industry linkages with other institutions, both locally and globally, and to study their evolution during the period after economic liberalization was initiated. In this book, I aim to trace the evolution and internationalization of Indian firms over the last decade. I focus on the role of knowledge in organizational evolution and in economic development. In addition, I hope to capture the dynamism and spirit underlying these changes by adopting a lens that allows for multifaceted perspectives. Using organizational data from my field studies, I examine the nature of these microeconomic and organizational changes and their implications at the macro level. These studies suggest that these micro changes engendered an understanding and reinterpretation of national identity, aligning it with those prevailing in industrialized countries. I am deeply indebted to the organizations that participated in the initial study and permitted subsequent rounds of interviews at...