Asian-Pacific Rim Logistics

Asian-Pacific Rim Logistics

Global Context and Local Policies

Peter J. Rimmer

Encompassing China, Japan, South Korea and Southeast Asia, extending to Australasia and connecting with South Asia, the Asian-Pacific Rim forms the world’s most dynamic economic region. Comprehending the region’s logistical structure and its institutions are of pivotal importance for businesses, researchers and policy-makers.

Chapter 1: Global + local logistics: Asian-Pacific Rim perspectives

Peter J. Rimmer

Subjects: asian studies, asian economics, business and management, operations management, economics and finance, asian economics, regional economics, urban and regional studies, regional economics

Extract

The ‘seven Rs’ (of logistics) stand for having the right product, in the right quantity, in the right condition, at the right place, at the right time, for the right customer, at the right cost (Wisner et al., 2008, 358). In 1950 the impoverished and economically stagnating coastal arena stretching from Russia to the Indonesian archipelago was not designated as the ‘Asian-Pacific Rim’ but subsumed under the British term ‘the Far East’, an expression covering the lands beyond India, but excluding Australasia or Oceania. Despite the Far East’s historical importance in international trade during both the pre-colonial and the colonial eras, there was no pressing need for perspectives on logistics. At that time logistics was still a branch of military science, having to do with procuring, maintaining and transporting material, personnel and facilities. There was no formal or integrated concept linking highly fragmented logistics activities with manufacturing and marketing. The terms ‘global logistics’ and ‘local logistics’ were not in fashion, nor were container shipping, jumbo jets and the Internet in operation. Fast-forwarding 60 years to the second decade of the new millennium, the situation has changed dramatically. The Asian-Pacific Rim, covering the archipelago between the Russian Far East and Indonesia and, on occasions, extended to include Oceania, is now a defined area for academic study (Le Heron and Park, 1995).