A Grand Design for Peace and Reconciliation

A Grand Design for Peace and Reconciliation

Achieving Kyosei in East Asia

Edited by Yoichiro Murakami and Thomas J. Schoenbaum

Scholars from Japan and a range of other countries explore in this book the still-unfinished effort to achieve the reconciliation of old enmities left over from past wars in East Asia. They present concrete policy proposals for a ‘grand design’ of peace based on the Japanese concept of ‘kyosei’, a word roughly translated as ‘conviviality’. A positive peace through kyosei means not only the absence of violence, but also the amelioration of past injustices, exploitation and oppression. The diversity of disciplines represented in the volume—international law and politics, history, philosophy and theology – enrich the contributors’ search for an intellectually appropriate, practically transformative and viable grand theory of peace in the twenty-first century. Chapters address issues such as security in North–South conflict situations, foreign policy strategies for Japan, the perspective of comparative religions, and current skepticism for the possibility of peace and reconciliation. These insightful and compelling analyses will be of great interest to students and researchers of East Asia and the politics of peace in general.

Preface

Edited by Yoichiro Murakami and Thomas J. Schoenbaum

Subjects: asian studies, asian law, law - academic, asian law, human rights, public international law, politics and public policy, human rights, international politics, international relations, terrorism and security

Extract

Yoichiro Murakami, Thomas Schoenbaum and Shin Chiba As is widely known, imperial Japan fought the most devastating and miserable war – the so-called Fifteen Year War (1930–45) – which had disastrous consequences and led to horrible losses. The Japanese troops’ invasion of neighboring and “enemy” nations is reported to have resulted in approximately twenty million casualties, including invaders and victims, soldiers and civilians. Immediately after the defeat, the Japanese people’s firm determination to avoid repeating the same folly of war-making produced several memorable deeds and institutions. Among them is the Japanese Constitution of 1947 called the “Peace Constitution”. In the Japanese Constitution one can find the Japanese people’s firm resolution for the renouncement of war and the renunciation of military force. Another precious creation after the defeat was certainly the founding of International Christian University (ICU), Tokyo, Japan. This highly renowned and preeminent small liberal arts university is located in the western suburbs of Tokyo. In 1949 ICU was founded as the “university of tomorrow” and dedicated to bringing forth young men and women as makers of and workers for reconciliation and world peace. The founding of ICU can rightly be understood as a symbol of reconciliation between the United States and Japan, as many churches and individual Christians in the United States, together with a number of dedicated Japanese citizens, cooperated and donated in order to create this “university of tomorrow”. Thus, the 21st Century Center of Excellence (COE) program in the field of multidisciplinary peace research has not only...