Table of Contents

Handbook of Research on High-Technology Entrepreneurs

Handbook of Research on High-Technology Entrepreneurs

Elgar original reference

Edited by Ayala Malach-Pines and Mustafa F. Özbilgin

This comprehensive Handbook presents an extensive overview of empirical and conceptual developments in the study of high-tech entrepreneurs from an interdisciplinary and multinational perspective.

Introduction

Ayala Malach-Pines and Mustafa F. Ozbilgin

Subjects: business and management, entrepreneurship, human resource management, innovation and technology, technology and ict

Extract

Ayala Malach-Pines and Mustafa F. Özbilgin The word ‘entrepreneur’ is derived from the French verb entreprendre meaning ‘to undertake’. Almost 80 years ago, Joseph Schumpeter described the entrepreneur as an innovator and a catalyst of change who continuously does things that have not been done before and do not fit established societal patterns (Schumpeter, 1934). Many other definitions have been offered since then, until it was suggested in the late 1980s that rather than trying to define an entrepreneur, effort should be invested in trying to differentiate different types of entrepreneurship (Gartner, 1989). The current volume focuses on high-technology entrepreneurs. High technology (high-tech) includes manufacturing and services industries that employ a high proportion of scientific, technical and engineering personnel (Chapple et al., 2004). The Handbook brings together empirical and conceptual developments in the study of high-tech entrepreneurs from an interdisciplinary, multinational perspective. It includes chapters from such diverse paradigms as psychology, sociology, management, economics and ethnography and authors from the US, Canada, Australia, India, the UK, Ireland, Israel, Germany, Switzerland, Holland, Turkey, Poland and Hungary. The 22 chapters, organized in six parts, offer different conceptual frameworks and definitions of high-tech entrepreneurs and of the entrepreneurial process based on studies in different settings and contexts. Contextual depth is also attained via cross-national and cross-sectoral studies of high-tech entrepreneurs. Contextual perspectives are supported by studies which examined the making of entrepreneurs in terms of antecedents, correlates and consequences of their career choices, resources and strategies from diverse contexts. Several chapters examine issues...