Trafficking and Human Rights

Trafficking and Human Rights

European and Asia-Pacific Perspectives

Edited by Leslie Holmes

Human trafficking is widely considered to be the fastest growing branch of trafficking. It has moved rapidly up the agenda of states and international organisations since the early-1990s, not only because of this growth, but also as its implications for security and human rights have become clearer. This fascinating study by European and Australian specialists provides original research findings on human trafficking, with particular reference to Europe, South-East Asia and Australia. A major focus is on how many states and organisations act in ways that undermine trafficking victims’ rights.

Preface and acknowledgments

Edited by Leslie Holmes

Subjects: asian studies, asian law, development studies, migration, law - academic, asian law, human rights, politics and public policy, human rights, international relations, social policy and sociology, migration

Extract

The present volume grew out of a conference entitled ‘Sex ‘n’ Drugs and Shifty Roles’ held at the Contemporary Europe Research Centre (CERC), University of Melbourne, in December 2006. For their generous sponsorship of that conference, I wish to thank the Goethe Institut (Melbourne Branch), and the European Union’s Jean Monnet Fund. And for all their help in very practical ways, I thank CERC’s Director, Philomena Murray; its former manager, Geraldine East; and CERC’s many postgraduates. Several of the chapters in this volume started life as papers at the CERC conference just mentioned. However, for various reasons, four of the original contributors eventually proved to be unable to convert their conference papers into chapters, despite having agreed to rework and update their papers. In three cases, the editor was not informed about this inability, and waited expectantly for the chapters. When it finally became obvious that the chapters would not be forthcoming, it looked as if the book project would, regrettably, fall through; there was simply not enough critical mass. But two specialists who had not been involved with the original conference in any way very kindly agreed to produce chapters at extremely short notice, so that the project was once again viable. Those two people – Stephanie Schwandner-Sievers and Sallie Yea – deserve my special thanks. But I also want to thank all of the other contributors for their patience and support; many could have taken their chapters elsewhere, and I owe each and every one of the original contributors a...