Towards the Third Generation University

Towards the Third Generation University

Managing the University in Transition

J. G. Wissema

Universities are undergoing massive change, evolving from science-based, government-funded institutions into ‘international know-how hubs’ dubbed third generation universities, or 3GUs. J.G. Wissema explores this dramatic change, tracing the historic development of universities, and exploring the technology-based enterprises, technostarters and financiers for start-ups and young enterprises that are the main partners of these 3GUs. He goes on to illustrate that universities play a new role as incubators of new science or technology based commercial activities and take an active role in the exploitation of the knowledge they create. The book concludes with suggestions regarding the way in which changes in the university’s mission should be reflected in subsequent organisational changes.

Glossary

J. G. Wissema

Subjects: business and management, management and universities, organisation studies, education, management and universities

Extract

Note: Words in italics refer to other definitions in this list. Academic: member of the scientific staff of a university. Also used for scientists and technologists working for other know-how institutes. Accelerator: see incubator. Angels: see business angels. Appellation system (in the context of this book): from the French appellation d’ origine contrôlée – certified name of the origin (of wines). Using a hierarchy of names, the appellation statement indicates the quality of the wine as assessed by independent experts. Applied science: the use of existing theory to develop original new technology, adding applied knowledge without developing new theories in the domain of pure science. Also called technological development. Basic or fundamental research: the search for new scientific discoveries using mainly purely scientific methods. Only the scientific disciplines are defined; the direction is indicated but without specific objectives or applications. Mainly used in enterprises. Business angels (or, for short, angels; synonym for informal investors): individual investors who, alone or together with other angels, invest in young enterprises at the development phase or start-up phase. Such investments are usually high risk. Angels not only provide money, they also coach the founders or CEO of the enterprise and they make their networks available to the starter. In this way, they create a win–win relationship with the investment while they reduce the risk. Angels usually invest only in companies in product or service areas in which they have experience. Informal investment leads to...