Table of Contents

Microsoft on Trial

Microsoft on Trial

Legal and Economic Analysis of a Transatlantic Antitrust Case

New Horizons in Competition Law and Economics series

Edited by Luca Rubini

This fascinating and highly relevant book facilitates discussion on the difficult technical, legal and economic issues with respect to innovation, competition and welfare raised, through the span of more than a decade, by the US and EC Microsoft antitrust cases. It assesses their impact on the evolution of European and US laws on competition and intellectual property in the IT sector and beyond.

Chapter 13: The Quest for Appropriate Remedies in the EC Microsoft Cases: A Comparative Appraisal

Nicholas Economides and Ioannis Lianos

Subjects: economics and finance, competition policy, law and economics, law - academic, competition and antitrust law, european law, law and economics


Nicholas Economides and Ioannis Lianos 1. INTRODUCTION The Microsoft cases in the United States and in Europe have been influential in determining the contours of the substantive liability standards for dominant firms in US antitrust law and in EC competition law. The competition law remedies that were adopted, following the finding of liability, seem, however, to constitute the main measure for the ‘success’ of the case(s). An important disagreement exists between those arguing that the remedies put in place failed to address the roots of the competition law violation identified in the liability decision and others who advance the view that the remedies were far-reaching and that their alleged failure demonstrates the weakness of the liability claim. This study evaluates these claims by examining the variety of remedies that were finally imposed in the EC Microsoft cases, from a comparative perspective. The study begins with a discussion of the roots of the Microsoft issues in Europe and the consequent choice of a remedial approach by the European Commission and the European Court of First Instance (CFI). It then explores the effectiveness of the remedies in achieving the aims that were set. The nonconsideration of the structural remedy in the European case and the pros and cons of developing such a remedy in the future are briefly discussed before more emphasis is put on alternative remedies (competition and non-competition law ones) that have been suggested in the literature. The study concludes by discussing the fit between the remedy and the...

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