Climate Change and Growth in Asia

Climate Change and Growth in Asia

Edited by Moazzem Hossain and Eliyathamby Selvanthan

Climate Change and Growth in Asia is a comprehensive analysis of the major issues of climate change and global warming and their possible impacts on the growth of major Asian economies. The book addresses the climate change crisis in Asia within the context of three major challenges to growth: population, poverty and greenhouse gas emissions.

Chapter 3: Climate Change and Freshwater Resources of Bangladesh

Qazi Kholiquzzaman Ahmad

Subjects: asian studies, asian economics, economics and finance, asian economics, environmental economics, environment, asian environment, climate change, environmental economics


Qazi Kholiquzzaman Ahmad 3.1 INTRODUCTION This chapter is concerned with freshwater resources of Bangladesh in the context of climate change. Water is so crucial for human life and living that slogans such as ‘water for life’, ‘water for food’ and ‘water for ecosystem’ have been coined. Even without climate change, the water sector is beset with problems as a result of ever increasing demand, constraints on the availability of quality water and complexities in water sharing and use within and across countries. In the wake of climate change, these problems are magnifying and other problems, such as shifting and changing patterns of rainfall and increasing rainfall deficits in dry areas, are emerging. In view of all these, water management and governance issues are crucially important. 3.2 CLIMATE CHANGE: IMPACT AND VULNERABILITY 3.2.1 Climate Change Global warming caused by huge quantities of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, particularly over the past 150 years or so, has brought the global society face to face with an unprecedented threat in terms of intensifying global climate change. Natural climatic variability is usually small and one may not be much concerned about that. Anthropogenic climate change (that is, due to concentration of GHGs in the atmosphere emitted by human activities) is likely to be so devastating in the coming years and decades that it poses the greatest threat to the humankind as well as to planet Earth. The ramifications have already begun to be serious and will further worsen in future, in terms of, for example,...

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