Globalisation and Natural Resources Law

Globalisation and Natural Resources Law

Challenges, Key Issues and Perspectives

Elena Blanco and Jona Razzaque

This book examines the complex relationships between trade, human rights and the environment within natural resources law. It discusses key theories and challenges whilst exploring the concepts and approaches available to manage crucial natural resources in both developed and developing countries. Primarily aimed at undergraduates and postgraduates, it includes exercises, questions and discussion topics for courses on globalisation and /or natural resources law as well as an ample bibliography for those interested in further research. The book will therefore serve as an invaluable reference tool for academics, researchers and activists alike.

Introduction

Elena Blanco and Jona Razzaque

Subjects: environment, environmental law, law - academic, environmental law, human rights, politics and public policy, human rights

Extract

The relationship between globalisation, natural resources and economic growth is undeniably complex. The process of globalisation, with its increased volume of world trade, transport and communications and the growing affluence it creates, depends on the Earth’s resources for its very existence. Globalisation opens up the natural resource market and promotes economic liberalisation. Consequently, globalisation has an important role in determining the way a state manages and implements laws and regulations to protect and preserve natural resources. While the global recession of 2008 has illustrated the intertwining nature of the global economy and the lack of sufficient and adequate institutions of governance to deal with global concerns, it has also highlighted that much of the economy rests upon unsustainable factors. For example, consumption patterns in developed and developing countries alike show a dependence on non-renewable resources such as coal, gas and oil. While the energy sector is one of the most profitable sectors advancing economic growth, it also adds to the growing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions which in turn contribute to climate change. There is a tension between the North and the South1 regarding the ways to manage natural resources sustainably. Some resource rich developing countries push an unsustainable development path causing adverse environmental, socio-economic and related transboundary impacts. However, it is easier for the developed countries to call for a restricted approach to exploring natural resources when they have attained a certain level of economic development. The inability of the developed countries to reduce over-consumption of resources, regulate multinational enterprises...