Social Protection in Africa

Social Protection in Africa

Frank Ellis, Stephen Devereux and Phillip White

The purpose of this book is to make accessible to a broad audience the ideas, principles and practicalities of establishing effective social protection in Africa. It focuses on the major shift in strategy for tackling hunger and vulnerability, from emergency responses mainly in the form of food transfers to predictable cash transfers to the chronically poorest social groups. The diverse case studies in this book provide a unique and timely exploration of the effective, and less effective, ways that social transfers are delivered to the chronically poor and vulnerable in Sub-Saharan Africa.

Chapter 23: Case Study 13. Input Trade Fairs, Mozambique

Frank Ellis, Stephen Devereux and Phillip White

Subjects: development studies, development studies, social policy and sociology, comparative social policy, economics of social policy, social policy in emerging countries


OVERVIEW Input Trade Fairs (ITFs) are a mechanism for providing poor and vulnerable farm families with access to farm inputs, especially certified seed, in the wake of a disaster such as drought or floods that has destroyed their ability to restart agricultural production in the next season. In Mozambique, ITFs are considered a response to emergencies rather than a vehicle for ameliorating chronic vulnerability; nevertheless they provide a model that could apply equally to either objective. The basic format is to provide beneficiaries with a voucher of a given cash value that can be used to buy farm inputs at an input fair to which traders have been invited at a specific date and place. The fair typically lasts just one day, but provides a marketplace that can be attended by any number of buyers and sellers of inputs, farm produce and consumer goods in addition to those traders registered to receive vouchers from beneficiaries. ITFs in Mozambique are organized by the Ministry of Agriculture (MINAG) and Provincial and District Directorates of Agriculture in partnership with FAO. Pilot ITFs were tried out in 2001, in the wake of severe floods in the 2000–01 agricultural season, and they have subsequently been organized every year since 2003. Between 2003 and 2007, a total of 323 fairs were organized covering 266 030 beneficiaries mainly in the seven provinces of Maputo, Gaza, Inhambane, Tete, Manica, Sofala and Cabo Delgado. The total budgetary cost of ITFs in Mozambique in...

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