Cross-border Online Gambling Law and Policy

Cross-border Online Gambling Law and Policy

Julia Hörnle and Brigitte Zammit

This highly topical book analyses the conflicts between different regulatory regimes governing online gambling in the international context and how these affect the cross-border provision of online gambling.

Chapter 8: Concluding Thoughts

Julia Hörnle and Brigitte Zammit

Subjects: law - academic, internet and technology law, private international law


Brigitte Zammit At that point I ought to have gone away, but a strange sensation rose up in me, a sort of defiance of fate, a desire to challenge it, to put out my tongue at it. I laid down the largest stake allowed – four thousand gulden – and lost it. Then, getting hot, I pulled out all I had left, staked it on the same number, and lost again, after which I walked away from the table as though I were stunned. I could not even grasp what had happened to me.1 Gambling has existed in various forms and across civilizations since time immemorial. From the games with sticks and stones in ancient civilizations to the dice games in Greek mythology; from the pioneers of card games in the East to the monarchies in the West who decided the fate of nations by rolling a pair of dice; gambling has thrived and evolved over the ages. Online gambling today is evidence of this evolution – an evolution that is taking place at such a fast pace that law and regulation are finding it difficult to keep pace with it. Not only does the ubiquity of the internet pose new challenges to conventional legislation; the challenge is increased tenfold as a result of the tug-of-war between interested parties on multiple levels: between the legislators and the industry; between legislators of different countries; between supranational legislators like the EU and national legislators like the individual EU Member States. The web of political, social...

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