Governance and Intergovernmental Relations in the European Union and the United States

Governance and Intergovernmental Relations in the European Union and the United States

Theoretical Perspectives

Edited by Edoardo Ongaro, Andrew Massey, Marc Holzer and Ellen Wayenberg

This book represents a major attempt to draw together two fundamental streams of research: intergovernmental relations and multi-level governance (MLG). Combining US and European schools of thought, this timely volume outlines key areas of convergence and divergence.

Chapter 1: Introduction

Edoardo Ongaro, Andrew Massey, Marc Holzer and Ellen Wayenberg

Subjects: politics and public policy, public policy, regulation and governance

Extract

Edoardo Ongaro, Andrew Massey, Marc Holzer and Ellen Wayenberg INTRODUCTION: THE PURPOSE OF THE BOOK The rationale for this book is the proposition that there is a need for a major transatlantic social science dialogue on the status of the academic research on intergovernmental relations (IGR) and multi-level governance (MLG). Through the medium of this book and its companion volume (Policy, Performance and Management in Governance and Intergovernmental Relations: Transatlantic Perspectives) we present a series of scholarly and research-based papers intended to explore the status of the theories employed for explaining the dynamics of IGR and MLG and interpreting the developments relevant to both streams of research. Our purpose is to contribute to the academic debate, but also to engage practitioners in order to contribute to the process of assisting good governance and the positive development of public administration on both sides of the Atlantic. The concept of intergovernmental relations broadly refers to relations within the public sector, and enjoys a wider currency within US political science. The second concept, multi-level governance, is more pertinent to the study of the ‘crossroads’ of the vertical (intergovernmental) and horizontal (state-society) dimensions, found in Europe generally and the EU in particular. Consequently, the primary objective of this book is to build a bridge between the two academic communities and their particular research streams. Such an academic bridge is designed to interconnect the two sets of ‘cognitive maps’ employed by scholars on both sides of the Atlantic (see the arguments of Sbragia 2005 and...