Table of Contents

Self-Management and Leadership Development

Self-Management and Leadership Development

New Horizons in Management series

Edited by Mitchell G. Rothstein and Ronald J. Burke

Self-Management and Leadership Development offers a unique perspective on how leaders and aspiring leaders can and should take personal responsibility for their own development. This distinguished book is differentiated from other books on this topic with its view on the instrumental role played by individuals in managing their own development, rather than depending on others, such as their organization, to guide them. Expert scholars in the area of leadership emphasize the importance of self-awareness as the critical starting point in the process. Explicit recommendations are provided on how individuals can manage their own self-assessment as a starting point to their development. The contributors present insights and practical recommendations on how individuals can actively self-manage through a number of typical leadership challenges.

Chapter 7: How to Matter

Stewart Emery

Subjects: business and management, business leadership, organisational behaviour, politics and public policy, leadership


Stewart Emery Today, if someone took a poll of your customers, constituents, followers – whatever – and asked if you matter to them, how do you think you would come out? If you ceased to exist tomorrow, do you think anyone would really care? In other words, has your product, service, or brand established an emotional connection with your customers to the extent that they are invested in your enduring success? This is the deep soul-searching question we want you to ask yourself. Really, honestly, answer this. Are you a positive force in people’s lives? If you disappeared, would their lives be diminished in some way? DO YOU, IN FACT, MATTER? This is a question we ask senior managers to answer about their brand or business. The question takes on an added dimension when asked as a personal question. As a leader, as a manager, as an individual contributor, ask yourself three questions: Who are you? Think about this. At a very deep level this question probes to the core of what you stand for – your core values as a person and what deeply matters to you. This is a question that is not served by a series of rapid responses, but rather by a period of contemplative inquiry. You might be certain that you know the answer; however, ask some people you trust, who see you in action, what they think matters to you – what you’re about based on the way you act in daily personal and professional life. What do...

You are not authenticated to view the full text of this chapter or article.

Elgaronline requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books or journals. Please login through your library system or with your personal username and password on the homepage.

Non-subscribers can freely search the site, view abstracts/ extracts and download selected front matter and introductory chapters for personal use.

Your library may not have purchased all subject areas. If you are authenticated and think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

Further information