Table of Contents

Handbook of Regional Innovation and Growth

Handbook of Regional Innovation and Growth

Elgar original reference

Edited by Philip Cooke, Bjørn Asheim, Ron Boschma, Ron Martin, Dafna Schwartz and Franz Tödtling

Today, economic growth is widely understood to be conditioned by productivity increases which are, in turn, profoundly affected by innovation. This volume explores these key relationships between innovation and growth, bringing together experts from both fields to compile a unique Handbook.

Preface

Edited by Philip Cooke, Bjørn Asheim, Ron Boschma, Ron Martin, Dafna Schwartz and Franz Tödtling

Subjects: economics and finance, economics of innovation, evolutionary economics, regional economics, innovation and technology, economics of innovation, urban and regional studies, regional economics

Extract

Today, innovation has never been as visibly required nor as much embraced as a competitive strategy by firms and development authorities. There are four huge challenges that call forth expectations of strengthened innovation practice. The first of these in global ranking is the crisis of human-induced climate change which is heating up the average temperature of the planet so inexorably. Innovations to impact upon the amount and nature of energy use, water use and recycling are called for here; in other words a new emphasis on eco-innovation, more integrated and systemic than the environmental technologies of yesteryear. There is good news, in that such innovations are not beyond the leading high-technology edge: many already exist. They need strategic niche management and support for technological integration and human adjustment, including sensible subsidy regimes, to start making major contributions towards crisis mitigation. The second, related crisis concerns energy itself and the evident need to ramp up the use of renewable fuels and to replace fossil fuels in the energy mix. At the time of writing, a polluting crude oil leak from deep wells in the Caribbean has just been capped, albeit temporarily, just as the polluting company announces yet another deep and difficult project in Libya. Such is the difficulty of extraction that it cannot be very long before diminishing returns to investment, or stricter regulation, put an end to such dangerous risk-taking. Then the full attention of the oil giants can be directed towards a post-hydrocarbon innovation future. The third and...